Voyage through Salvation Time on the Maglev

Another cool feature of Salvation Time? Maglev bullet trains that can traverse the ocean. Here’s a brief excerpt from Step Three of the novel as the travelers and their hostess Naomi are making their way from London to New York City via the Atlantic Ocean:

While Big Ben, Westminster Abbey and Parliament disappeared in the distance, Naomi explained that both the land train and trans-oceanic train ran on pure electricity and magnetism. Even when traveling under the sea, the trans-oceanic train moved just as smoothly as its counterpart on land—at a much faster speed of 2000 miles per hour. Thus, it would carry them to New York City in less than two hours, due to the vacuum inside the tubing. Unlike its counterpart on land, it also moved through four massive, concentric carbon fiber tubes held up by cables anchored securely to the ocean floor. In between each massive tube was ample space for protection, with the train moving within the innermost tube. While Naomi expected that most of their trip would be underwater, the tubes could also be elevated above the surface, creating an illusion of riding on a cruise ship—without the turbulence created by waves. And to offer passengers spectacular views of sea life, the trans-oceanic maglev featured panoramic LCD screens throughout its interior walls, thanks to cameras on the outer tubes.

Sound too good to be true? Here’s a balanced excerpt from Anirudh Nambiar’s Design Blog from December, 2013:

One has to also consider the trade offs of this design. Removing all the air from the tunnel would take “100 jet engines, working 24 hours per day for two weeks”. This raises big questions related to the sustainability of the project. Another concern is safety. Any derailing of the train would cause the death of hundreds. At such high speeds, it is difficult to guarantee the complete safety of passengers.

No doubt, a maglev train connecting two continents would have a positive impact on the lives of many. It would mobilize businessmen, goods and services, increasing economic activity and globalization. On a human level, a student studying in the States could go back home for Thanksgiving in the matter of hours. As good as it sounds, is it worth spending $12 trillion (nearly 15% of the world’s GDP) on a tunnel that takes 100 years to build? There is no easy way to answer this question, but I do believe that mankind is destined to accomplish this feat in the future.

In another post I’ll go into more detail as to why I — as an engineer myself — believe the trans-oceanic maglev is not only possible but inevitable. In the coming months I’ll have much more to say about the practicality of my ideas which will make life much easier and simpler for everyone all around the world. In the meantime, check out these images of Salvation Time’s preferred method of travel.

 

 

 

 

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Posted on April 16, 2014, in Steps To Salvation and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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